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In the processing of project, plenty of change situations may happen. For the internal change, the project team might meet the reassignment of staff. For the external change, the team may receive a negative feedback from professor or clients which requires the changing of the project content or procedure. When meeting these situations, the team can never assume that everyone knows why this change is needed. It is necessary for the project manager to let  stakeholders and every team member have a clear understanding of why the change is needed and how this will improve the performance or results of the project. Therefore, when the team are going through a change, we need to strictly base on the change request(CR) flow which is shown in form 5.1. 

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Step

Description

Generate CR

A submitter completes a CR Form and sends the completed form to the Change Manager

Log CR Status

The Change Manager enters the CR into the CR Log. The CR’s status is updated throughout the CR process as needed.

Evaluate CR

Project personnel review the CR and provide an estimated level of effort to process, and develop a proposed solution for the suggested change

Authorize

Approval to move forward with incorporating the suggested change into the project/product

Implement

If approved, make the necessary adjustments to carry out the requested change and communicate CR status to the submitter and other stakeholders

Form 5.1. Change Request Flow

For each change request, the project manager should evaluate and prioritize it. First, assign the change request to a qualitative level, such as high, medium and low. This step will help project manager to arrange the change plan schedule when there are several of changes during the same period. Then, defining the type of the change by its scope, time, duration, resources, deliverables, processes and quality. Classification step is to make sure that the manager can customize the change plan directly and accurately. During the change, establishing a well-communicated and achievable milestone is necessary. According to Marcotte, an expert of change management, 70% of changes fail because people believe that results relative to the effort aren’t worth it, or aren’t working. After evaluating its significance and making the change plan, the state of each change request need to be assigned, e.g. open, work in progress, testing and closed.
The end result of an change management capability is that individuals embrace change more quickly and effectively, and organizations are able to respond quickly to environmental changes, embrace strategic initiatives, and adopt new technology more quickly and with less productivity impact.