User-Friendly Recital Teller System Abstract—Recital teller system helps

User-Friendly Recital Teller System  Abstract—Recital teller system helps in connecting people around the globe to create and come-up with recitals from their experiences. These recitals can be inspirational recitals from their experiences of life, humorous or amusing jokes with your friends or families. All of us have some good recitals which we would like to share with many people but may not often find such a platform where our recitals are recognized. This system provides one such platform where one can read and write recitals of their own.New groups like Wattpad, Scribd, Figment, Autonomy, and Fiction press are used for connecting two or a group of people for sharing their experiences and recitals, but in these applications the reader has to search for their recital based on their preference. The recital teller system helps in improving the imagination and creativity of the author. The recital submitted by an author will be reviewed by a reviewer to make sure that it does not contain any defile or misemploy language, and then it is imported into the portal. Recitals of different situations will be present and can be categorized accordingly. By this the users will be given a freehand to read, write, and share their recitals.   I. INTRODUCTIONThe popularity of various social networking applications has brought opportunities for Internet users to reuse and share things like ideas, images, datasets, videos, interests, traffic information, reviews etc. Many types of social network applications are designed to encourage the exchange of thoughts and to create a community. While the rise in the sharing of video clips in Youtube, Snapchat, Facebook and Instagram do compromise personal experiences.  However, the knowledge gained by users while carrying out the repetitive routines is locked away and is inaccessible to others. Even though we have 21st century communication infrastructure, we have no easy way to reuse or share our knowledge about how we do what we do Existing mechanisms of sharing personal experiences lack a process model that can document personal experiences in a structured and collective manner.  After the completion of a task, users can write a reflection or comment on how the task went, attach pictures, video or documents relevant to the tasks and share that with people in his/her social network. This is different from a business process which is only interested in recording when or whether a task has been executed successfully. We believe that the lack of a systematic   approach for users to create, share, and reuse personal experiences in a collective learning environment is hindering our day to day productivity and unnecessarily preventing the accumulation of “crowd wisdom” that can benefit a virtual community. The project aims to provide a platform that helps in Connecting people around the globe to create and come up with stories from their experiences. These stories can be inspirational stories from their lives, a life experience, a funny moment with your friend. Every one of us have some really good stories which we would like to share with many people but we often does not find such a platform where our stories are appreciated. It helps in improving the imagination and creativity of the author since he need to form a very good story. The story submitted by an author will be reviewed to make sure that it does not contain any foul or abusive language and then it is published into the portal. Stories of different genres will be present and will be categorized accordingly. One can read a story depending upon their mood just by signing in to the app.II.  LITERATURE SURVEY “Telling Tales: Storytelling as a Methodological Approach in Research” by Tara Rooney, Katrina Lawlor and Eddie Rohan1 introduces the application of storytelling as a methodology in a consumer relationship context. A theoretical overview of Story as a unique narrative form is presented. The inquiry was conducted in the consumer banking sector using a blended narrative approach of storytelling and life history narratives. Research design was exploratory in nature and pursuant of an interpretivist perspective.  “Storytelling” by Josina Vink2 is Storytelling is a flexible design research method with a broad range of applications, associated processes and variations. While there are no universal standards for implementation, there are a variety of documented procedures for using storytelling for different purposes within a design research project.”Mining Knowledge in Storytelling Systems for Narrative Generation” by Eugenio Conceptcion and pablo Gervas and gonzalo mendez 3 Storytelling systems are computational systems designed to tell stories. Every story generation system defines its specific knowledge representation for supporting the storytelling process. Thus, there is a shared need amongst all the systems: the knowledge must be expressed unambiguously to avoid inconsistencies.”STORY TELLING IN ACTION RESEARCH PROJECTS” by  Dr. Simon Bell  and Professor Trevor Wood-Harper 4, This paper sets out the two multi-methodologies applied in Action Research form in projects specifically in Malta, Bangladesh, Lebanon and Slovenia, and the manner in which the first steps of adapted Multiview and Imagine/SPSA methodologies were applied.”Virtual Storytelling. Using Virtual Reality Technologies for Storytelling ” by Gérard Subso5  is story classification taxonomy which categories stories based on epic, comic, tragic and romantic dimensions and follows the Beginning, Middle and End configuration (BME). Procedures used in this study are presented to serve as a guide for researchers interested in undertaking storytelling in the field of consumer and business research. We conclude that storytelling is a valuable methodology for exploring consumer relationships as it allows researchers to trace the evolution and development of the interaction by analysing the story typologies associated with each relationship phase.  III. PROPOSED METHODOLOGYMultiple options will be provided to the user which will allow them to browse the recitals based on their preferences..It takes less time for searching and provides a platform which is user friendly..                                                                                                           Figure : Context diagramThe user can register for the system and the information is stored in the database.Authentication of the user takes place and if the user is a valid then the user can read or write recitals.The user can read recitals based on the category and appreciate them. User can write new recitals or edit them. Admin verifies if it is a valid recital and publish the recital.  User Information Maintenance: In User Info Maintenance, the admin provides an option for either sign up or log in so that the user can read/write the stories. During the sign up the details that are entered by the user are stored in a cloud database. This database is stored in a secured manner such that it does not violate the privacy of the users.  Authenticate the users: Now, once an account has been created for a user. He can log into the portal by providing the credentials and the password that he enters is encrypted so that it cannot be decoded. Now these credentials are verified with those that were provided at the time of sign up. If the details are matched he gets an entry into the system, if not an error would be displayed.  Verify the stories and publish them: In this module, the stories that are submitted by the user are verified by review committee whose job is to make sure that the story is free of abusive and offensive language. Once the story gets a green signal from them, it is then posted into the portal where it can be read by all the other users. Platform for writing/reading a story: The application consists of a segment(tab) where the users can enter into the reading stories section where he can choose the story from different segments available and browse through the stories available.IV. CONCLUSIONEveryone of us have some really good stories which we would like to share with many people but we often does not find such a platform where our stories are appreciated. We have taken that as an opportunity in building this project and have made a to-do list that covers all the features that are essential in a recital teller application. V. ACKNOLEDGMENTWe would like to express our gratitude to all the people behind the screen who helped us to transform an idea into a real application. We would like to express our heart-felt gratitude to our parents without whom we would not have been privileged to achieve and fulfill our dream. We are grateful to our principal, Mr. L.V.N PRASAD who most ably run the institution and has had the major hand in enabling us to do our project. We profoundly thank Dr. K.SRINIVASA REDDY, Head of the Department of Computer Science & Engineering who has been an excellent guide and also a great source of inspiration to our work. We would like to thank our internal guide ASSOSIATE PROFESSOR.B.DHANLAXMI  for his technical guidance, constant encouragement and support in carrying out our project at college. The satisfaction and euphoria that accompany the successful completion of the task would be great but incomplete without the mention of the people who made it possible with their constant guidance and encouragement crowns all the efforts with success. In this context, we would like to thank all the other staff members, both teaching and non-teaching, who have extended their timely help and eased our task. References1 “Telling Tales: Storytelling as a Methodological Approach in Research” by Tara Rooney, Katrina Lawlor and Eddie Rohan. 2 “Storytelling” by Josina Vink3″Mining Knowledge in Storytelling Systems for Narrative Generation” by Eugenio Conceptcion and pablo Gervas and gonzalo mendez.  4″STORY TELLING IN ACTION RESEARCH PROJECTS” by  Dr. Simon Bell  and Professor Trevor Wood-Harper  5 Virtual Storytelling. Using Virtual Reality Technologies for Storytelling ” by Gérard Subso6 I. Weber, H. Paik, and B. Benatallah, “Form-based web service composition for domain experts,” TWEB, vol. 8, no. 1, p. 2, 2013. 7 I. Weber, H.-Y. Paik, B. Benatallah, C. Vorwerk, L. Zheng, and S. Kim, “Personal Process Management: Design and Execution for End-Users,” UNSW-CSE-TR-1018, Tech. Rep., 2010. 8 M. Brambilla, “Application and simplification of BPM techniques for personal process management,” in Business Process Management Workshops – BPM 2012 International Workshops, Tallinn, Estonia, September 3, 2012. Revised Papers, 2012, pp. 227–233. 9 J. Xu, H. Paik, A. H. H. Ngu, and L. Zhan, “Personal process description graph for describing and querying personal processes,” in Databases Theory and Applications – 26th Australasian Database Conference, ADC, 2015, pp. 91–103. 10 A. Koschmider, M. Song, and H. A. Reijers, “Social Software for Modeling Business Processes,” in Business Process Management Workshops, 2008, pp. 666–677.