World reducing the number of people who live

World leaders gathered
at the united nation to shape a broad vision to fight poverty in its many
dimensions. They broke them in sustainable development goals which was later
changed and called the millennium development goals MDGs. The MDGs have saved
millions and improved the conditions of many more. The goals include
eradicating extreme poverty and hunger, achieve universal primary education,
promote gender equality and empower women, reduce child mortality, improve
maternal health, combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases, ensure environmental
stability and finally develop global partnership for development.

Despite many successes,
the poorest and most vulnerable people are being left behind because of their
sex, age, disability, ethnicity or geographical locationMDG 2015.But with
global action. Things will be turned around. This is the only path to ensure
that the development agenda leaves no one behind. A bold new agenda is emerging
to transform the world to better meet human needs and the requirements of
economic transformation, while protecting the environment ensuring peace and
realizing human rights.MDG  2015

Global poverty has
declined significantly over the past 20 years. The target of the MDGs is to
reduce poverty by half the number of people living in extreme poverty. The
poverty rate in the developing regions has decreased from 47% in 1992 to 14% in
2015. All developing regions except sub-Saharan Africa had met the target of
reducing the number of people who live in extreme poverty by 2011. The world’s
most populous countries china and India have played a central role in the
global in the global reduction of povertyMDG 2015. Sub-Saharan Africa poverty
rate started to reduce in 2002 but it remains to tag along far behind because it
has a number of countries such as Nigeria and Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC)
with the highest number of people living in poverty.

In Africa women suffer
the greater risk of living in poverty because of unequal access to paid work,
lower earnings, lack of social protection and limited access to assets
including land and property hence living the vulnerable to povertyMDG 2015. As
the global economy enters a new period slower growth widening inequalities and
employment is not expanding fast enough to keep up with the growing need of labor
force.  According to the international labor
organization ILO, Africa still has the largest number of unemployed people.
Employment opportunities remain to be a challenge to both developing and develop
countries. The employment situation in sub-Saharan Africa has slightly improved
but progress in livelihood has been offset by persistently high underemployment
as well as lo labor productivity

Youth especially young
women, continue to be affected limited employment and unemployment. The youth unemployment
is three times higher than the rate of adults this situation is evident in the
northern Africa. MDG
2015

Although the MDGs
targets to eliminate extreme poverty and hunger will be challenging. Many of
the people suffering the most are the people living in fragile and remote
areas. Access to good schools, health care, electricity, safe water and other
critical services remains elusive for many people and it frequently determines
the socioeconomic status, gender, ethnicity or geography. MDG 2015Eradicating
poverty and hunger remains at the core of the development agenda.

The number of Africans living
below poverty increased even thou globally the poverty rate has dropped. In 1990
the number of people living in poverty was 376 million but in 2010 the number
increased to 414 million. Nigeria has a total of 25%, DRC 13%, Tanzania 6% and Ethiopia
5%. This is an indication that economic growth has failed to improve the living
condition of people in Africa. This shows that the growth structure matters because
it is vital for reducing poverty

Efforts
to combat HIV/AIDS, malaria, TB and other diseases in Africa have yielded impressive
results since 1990. African countries have adopted WHO recommended programmes interventions
such as using insecticides treated nets and antiretroviral medicines for
HIV/AIDS. This has demonstrated high level of political commitment to combating
each of the diseases. Africa carries the highest burden of HIV/AIDS, malaria,
TB and other diseases. The number of people living with HIV/AIDS has reduced in
Africa regions especially east Africa which has reduced by 46% while in north-Africa
it has remained constant at low level. Angola and Uganda has been worsening
situations and occurrence of new infections in countries such as Rwanda,
Eritrea, and Botswana has registered a reduction of HIV/AIDS related deaths. This
has been possible due to a number of factors including improvement of testing, cancelling
and access to antiretroviral therapy; reduction of mother-child transmission,
the increase of prevention through the use of condoms and the improvements of
general awareness and knowledge of the diseases including a better understanding
of the link between HIV/AIDS and TB. Stigma continues to be a challenge to the
national response in the effort to eliminate HIV. There is need to educate
people to avoid discriminating persons with HIV.

According
to reports women are the most infected and living with the disease. This has
raised concerns on the number of children infected and other vulnerable groups
such as young people and those affected during conflicts, disasters and displacement.
Gender based violence and sexual abuse has been a factor increasing the spread
of HIV. The lack of access to education, health services and social protection
are likely to undermine the ability to protect them against HIV and to access
antiretroviral therapy.

Engaging
men in the fight against HIV has also been proven to be productive in the
reduction of these diseases. UNAID has invested billions in AIDs response in Africa
excluding North Africa which come from domestic sources and international
sources. HIV/AIDs can undermine human capital and productivity and hence become
a challenge to structural transformation that countries must address by all
means possible.

 Africa has shown a downward trend in the
malaria cases and death especially in North Africa for example in 2010 morocco
was declared a malaria free zone and in other African regions malaria has
reduced by 34%. The use of effective intervention has remained at the heart of Africa
to see the reduction of malaria.

TB
incidences and death rates have reduced from 2000. Central African Republic, Egypt,
Eritrea, Ghana, Malawi, Niger, Rwanda and Uganda are some of the countries
experiences highest reduction rate with more than 50%. Some other countries
such as Cameroon. South Africa, Lesotho and Swaziland have had several
incidences of TB and have doubled since 1990. The changes and treatment of TB
has been successful through the use of Directly Observed Treatments DOTs. The
challenges still remain due to TB and HIV/AIDs co-infection and occurrence of
multi-drug resistant. The challenges must be addressed by focusing on at risk
groups including women, refugees, children and prisoners.

Health
crises cannot be avoided for example the Ebola outbreak in West Africa in December
2013 which began in the rural guinea near the border of Sierra Leone and LiberiaMDG
2015.
In 2014 Ebola spread to urban areas and it was the first time the disease was
carried abroad by our travelers, highlighting the potential global risk of the
disease. In the late 2014 Ebola was declared a public health emergency of
international concerns. The outbreak did not only affect the health sector but
also many aspects of development. The countries suffered from reduction of
agricultural production, food security, reduced wages, and investments by international
companies. MDG 2015The Ebola outbreak provided a lesson for
stopping future epidemics

Forests
serve multiple environmental, socio-economical and cultural roles in many
countries. They also play a role in global carbon cycle. A mojor concer had been
on human activities  toward forest growth,
general forest health and the regeneration process. Forest- areas are
continuing and fast-decreasing might be a signal of unsustainable practices in
the forest and agricultural sector. The global rate of deforestation has slowed
in the last decade. There is a need to develop and implement policies that
encourage the sustainable management of forests in order to provide a wide
range of ozone depleting substances and services and that also contributes to poverty
reduction and the development of rural communities. MDG report 2015

Africa
accounts for a small percentage of carbon dioxide co2 emitted each year. Libya
and other countries such as South Africa, Mauritius, emitted the most co2 while
Lesotho emitted the lowest while DRC, Gabon, Mauritania, Rwanda reduced co2 emissions.
Some other countries such as Angola, Nigeria, and Algeria registered a
significant increase. Co2 emission leads a decomposition of organic soil, soil degradation
and erosion. Climate change has serious negative effects on economic growth. There
is a need to develop and improve local systems to allow for proper monitoring
of co2 emissions. Increased investment in the field of renewable energy and the
promotion of resource efficient and cleaner production that is required to
bring down the level of Co2 emission.

Most
African countries are on the track in the reduction of consumption of ozone depleting
substances. Most Africans countries are part of the Montréal protocol which has
made remarkable progress with respect to reduce their consumption of substances
that deplete the Earth’s ozone layer. Despite the achievement made but countries
such as Algeria, Djibouti, and Tanzania among others, some countries have experienced
an increase in ozone depleting substances such as Swaziland and central Africa republic.
This might be due World leaders gathered
at the united nation to shape a broad vision to fight poverty in its many
dimensions. They broke them in sustainable development goals which was later
changed and called the millennium development goals MDGs. The MDGs have saved
millions and improved the conditions of many more. The goals include
eradicating extreme poverty and hunger, achieve universal primary education,
promote gender equality and empower women, reduce child mortality, improve
maternal health, combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases, ensure environmental
stability and finally develop global partnership for development.Despite many successes,
the poorest and most vulnerable people are being left behind because of their
sex, age, disability, ethnicity or geographical locationMDG 2015.But with
global action. Things will be turned around. This is the only path to ensure
that the development agenda leaves no one behind. A bold new agenda is emerging
to transform the world to better meet human needs and the requirements of
economic transformation, while protecting the environment ensuring peace and
realizing human rights.MDG  2015Global poverty has
declined significantly over the past 20 years. The target of the MDGs is to
reduce poverty by half the number of people living in extreme poverty. The
poverty rate in the developing regions has decreased from 47% in 1992 to 14% in
2015. All developing regions except sub-Saharan Africa had met the target of
reducing the number of people who live in extreme poverty by 2011. The world’s
most populous countries china and India have played a central role in the
global in the global reduction of povertyMDG 2015. Sub-Saharan Africa poverty
rate started to reduce in 2002 but it remains to tag along far behind because it
has a number of countries such as Nigeria and Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC)
with the highest number of people living in poverty.In Africa women suffer
the greater risk of living in poverty because of unequal access to paid work,
lower earnings, lack of social protection and limited access to assets
including land and property hence living the vulnerable to povertyMDG 2015. As
the global economy enters a new period slower growth widening inequalities and
employment is not expanding fast enough to keep up with the growing need of labor
force.  According to the international labor
organization ILO, Africa still has the largest number of unemployed people.
Employment opportunities remain to be a challenge to both developing and develop
countries. The employment situation in sub-Saharan Africa has slightly improved
but progress in livelihood has been offset by persistently high underemployment
as well as lo labor productivityYouth especially young
women, continue to be affected limited employment and unemployment. The youth unemployment
is three times higher than the rate of adults this situation is evident in the
northern Africa. MDG
2015Although the MDGs
targets to eliminate extreme poverty and hunger will be challenging. Many of
the people suffering the most are the people living in fragile and remote
areas. Access to good schools, health care, electricity, safe water and other
critical services remains elusive for many people and it frequently determines
the socioeconomic status, gender, ethnicity or geography. MDG 2015Eradicating
poverty and hunger remains at the core of the development agenda. The number of Africans living
below poverty increased even thou globally the poverty rate has dropped. In 1990
the number of people living in poverty was 376 million but in 2010 the number
increased to 414 million. Nigeria has a total of 25%, DRC 13%, Tanzania 6% and Ethiopia
5%. This is an indication that economic growth has failed to improve the living
condition of people in Africa. This shows that the growth structure matters because
it is vital for reducing poverty.Efforts
to combat HIV/AIDS, malaria, TB and other diseases in Africa have yielded impressive
results since 1990. African countries have adopted WHO recommended programmes interventions
such as using insecticides treated nets and antiretroviral medicines for
HIV/AIDS. This has demonstrated high level of political commitment to combating
each of the diseases. Africa carries the highest burden of HIV/AIDS, malaria,
TB and other diseases. The number of people living with HIV/AIDS has reduced in
Africa regions especially east Africa which has reduced by 46% while in north-Africa
it has remained constant at low level. Angola and Uganda has been worsening
situations and occurrence of new infections in countries such as Rwanda,
Eritrea, and Botswana has registered a reduction of HIV/AIDS related deaths. This
has been possible due to a number of factors including improvement of testing, cancelling
and access to antiretroviral therapy; reduction of mother-child transmission,
the increase of prevention through the use of condoms and the improvements of
general awareness and knowledge of the diseases including a better understanding
of the link between HIV/AIDS and TB. Stigma continues to be a challenge to the
national response in the effort to eliminate HIV. There is need to educate
people to avoid discriminating persons with HIV.According
to reports women are the most infected and living with the disease. This has
raised concerns on the number of children infected and other vulnerable groups
such as young people and those affected during conflicts, disasters and displacement.
Gender based violence and sexual abuse has been a factor increasing the spread
of HIV. The lack of access to education, health services and social protection
are likely to undermine the ability to protect them against HIV and to access
antiretroviral therapy.Engaging
men in the fight against HIV has also been proven to be productive in the
reduction of these diseases. UNAID has invested billions in AIDs response in Africa
excluding North Africa which come from domestic sources and international
sources. HIV/AIDs can undermine human capital and productivity and hence become
a challenge to structural transformation that countries must address by all
means possible. Africa has shown a downward trend in the
malaria cases and death especially in North Africa for example in 2010 morocco
was declared a malaria free zone and in other African regions malaria has
reduced by 34%. The use of effective intervention has remained at the heart of Africa
to see the reduction of malaria.TB
incidences and death rates have reduced from 2000. Central African Republic, Egypt,
Eritrea, Ghana, Malawi, Niger, Rwanda and Uganda are some of the countries
experiences highest reduction rate with more than 50%. Some other countries
such as Cameroon. South Africa, Lesotho and Swaziland have had several
incidences of TB and have doubled since 1990. The changes and treatment of TB
has been successful through the use of Directly Observed Treatments DOTs. The
challenges still remain due to TB and HIV/AIDs co-infection and occurrence of
multi-drug resistant. The challenges must be addressed by focusing on at risk
groups including women, refugees, children and prisoners.Health
crises cannot be avoided for example the Ebola outbreak in West Africa in December
2013 which began in the rural guinea near the border of Sierra Leone and LiberiaMDG
2015.
In 2014 Ebola spread to urban areas and it was the first time the disease was
carried abroad by our travelers, highlighting the potential global risk of the
disease. In the late 2014 Ebola was declared a public health emergency of
international concerns. The outbreak did not only affect the health sector but
also many aspects of development. The countries suffered from reduction of
agricultural production, food security, reduced wages, and investments by international
companies. MDG 2015The Ebola outbreak provided a lesson for
stopping future epidemics.Forests
serve multiple environmental, socio-economical and cultural roles in many
countries. They also play a role in global carbon cycle. A mojor concer had been
on human activities  toward forest growth,
general forest health and the regeneration process. Forest- areas are
continuing and fast-decreasing might be a signal of unsustainable practices in
the forest and agricultural sector. The global rate of deforestation has slowed
in the last decade. There is a need to develop and implement policies that
encourage the sustainable management of forests in order to provide a wide
range of ozone depleting substances and services and that also contributes to poverty
reduction and the development of rural communities. MDG report 2015Africa
accounts for a small percentage of carbon dioxide co2 emitted each year. Libya
and other countries such as South Africa, Mauritius, emitted the most co2 while
Lesotho emitted the lowest while DRC, Gabon, Mauritania, Rwanda reduced co2 emissions.
Some other countries such as Angola, Nigeria, and Algeria registered a
significant increase. Co2 emission leads a decomposition of organic soil, soil degradation
and erosion. Climate change has serious negative effects on economic growth. There
is a need to develop and improve local systems to allow for proper monitoring
of co2 emissions. Increased investment in the field of renewable energy and the
promotion of resource efficient and cleaner production that is required to
bring down the level of Co2 emission.Most
African countries are on the track in the reduction of consumption of ozone depleting
substances. Most Africans countries are part of the Montréal protocol which has
made remarkable progress with respect to reduce their consumption of substances
that deplete the Earth’s ozone layer. Despite the achievement made but countries
such as Algeria, Djibouti, and Tanzania among others, some countries have experienced
an increase in ozone depleting substances such as Swaziland and central Africa republic.
This might be due to the imports of Hydro
chlorofluorocarbons HCFC equipment. ECA et al 2013

African
countries have also improved in the protection of terrestrial and marine areas such
Namibia, Congo, guinea Bissau and morocco. Also access to safe drinking water has
improved but sanitation still a challenge. The rural urban divide, lack of adequate
infrastructure and the poor sanitation on people living in slum further leads to
slow progress especially in improving water supply.the imports of Hydro
chlorofluorocarbons HCFC equipment. ECA et al 2013

African
countries have also improved in the protection of terrestrial and marine areas such
Namibia, Congo, guinea Bissau and morocco. Also access to safe drinking water has
improved but sanitation still a challenge. The rural urban divide, lack of adequate
infrastructure and the poor sanitation on people living in slum further leads to
slow progress especially in improving water supply.